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Vote 2017: Alabama special primary election results

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Election results from today’s special primary for U.S. Senate in Alabama …

Vote 2017More election coverage in our Vote 2017 special report.

(Updating throughout the evening.)

If needed, the runoff takes place Sept. 26.

Voter turnout statewide was 18 percent; in Jefferson County, 17 percent; in Shelby County, 21 percent. Compare that to the March 2016 primary — the most recent one with a Senate race — to 41 percent statewide, 43 percent in Jefferson County and 50 percent in Shelby County.

Results for Jefferson County and Shelby County.

Democrats

Winner in red | Runoff candidates in blue

Republicans

Winner in red | Runoff candidates in blue

*Dropped out.

Tweets

This just in on Twitter …

Facebook

Visit the Birmingham, Ala., page on Facebook.

• • •

More Vote 2017 coverage.

Vote 2017: Who will succeed Sen. Sessions?

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Voter registration - Alabama Theatre

Photo: Shannon McGee (CC)

President Trump picked Jeff Sessions to lead the Department of Justice earlier this year. Then-Gov. Bentley picked Alabama attorney general Luther Strange to fill his Senate seat until someone called a special election.

Vote 2017We dumped Bentley, and successor Gov. Kay Ivey put this election on the calendar.

Which leads us to today’s special primary.

A mere 16 men and one woman vie for the party nominations. This will be the first primary in which no party crossover voting is allowed between the primary and possible runoff on Sept. 26.

The polls are open: Voting takes place till 7 p.m. for this one race.

Q: Where do I vote?

A: Call Jefferson County: (205) 325-5550, Jefferson County (Bessemer only): (205) 481-4105, Shelby County: (205) 669-3913.

Or Search Your Polling Place on AlabamaVotes.gov.

Wade on Birmingham:
election results tonight

Remember, if you have problems at your polling place:

  • Notify a poll worker immediately.
  • Call the state attorney general at 1-800-831-8814 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Wednesday or fill out this online form.
  • Call the secretary of state at 1-800-274-VOTE (8683) or visit StopVoterFraudNow.com.
  • And tell the probate court for Jefferson County (205-325-5203) or Shelby County (205-669-3713).
  • E-mail us at Vote2017[at]wadeonbirmingham.com.

Q: What can I expect to see on the ballots?

A: Here they are …

Democrat Republican
2017 Democrat senator sample ballot 2017 Republican senator sample ballot

Note: Dom Gentile and Brian McGee dropped out of the race after ballots had been printed.

Let us know where and when you voted, and how many votes were cast before yours.

• • •

More Vote 2017 coverage.

Bentley out, Ivey in: newspaper front pages

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

A look at today’s newspapers, with front pages showing Gov. Bentley’s resignation and Kay Ivey’s swearing-in ceremony Monday.

Alabama

Anniston Star

The Anniston Star

Centre Post

The (Centre) Post

Decatur Daily

The Decatur Daily

Dothan Eagle

The Dothan Eagle

Enterprise Ledger

The Enterprise Ledger
(no mention of Bentley or Ivey)

Florence TimesDaily

The (Florence) TimesDaily

Gadsden Times

The Gadsden Times

Montgomery Advertiser

The Montgomery Advertiser

Opelika-Auburn News

The Opelika-Auburn News

Tuscaloosa News

The Tuscaloosa News

Birmingham News

The Birmingham News

Huntsville Times

The Huntsville Times

Mobile Press-Register

(Mobile) Press-Register

Elsewhere

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Boston Globe

The Boston Globe

Charleston Post and Courier

The (Charleston, S.C.) Post and Courier

Chattanooga Times Free Press

Chattanooga Times Free Press

Dallas Morning News

The Dallas Morning News

Greenwood Miss. Commonwealth

Greenwood (Miss.) Commonwealth

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Miami Herald

Miami Herald

New Orleans Times-Picayune

The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune

New York Times

The New York Times

Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal

Washington Post

The Washington Post

Zoom to full screen, zoom in on page details
and embed on your site.

Also:

Gov. Bentley resigns in disgrace

Monday, April 10th, 2017

Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey becomes second female governor of Alabama

Robert Bentley booking page

Booking page for Robert Bentley at the
Montgomery County Jail

Two-term and two-timing governor Robert Bentley was booked at the Montgomery County Jail this afternoon for campaign finance misdemeanors. He then resigned from office.

This morning, the House had begun impeachment hearings on Bentley, following the release of a committee report detailing numerous alleged incidents around the governor and an affair with his aide Rebekah Mason, one that ended his 50-year marriage to Dianne Bentley in 2015.

Among the cataloged misdeeds were bullying staff members, using the state plane for private getaways, illicit texting, ordering law enforcement officers to cover up the scandal and altering public records.

As part of a deal, Bentley pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a 30-day suspended jail sentence, 12 months probation, surrender of $36,912 in campaign funds, about $16,000 in fines and 100 hours of community service. He forfeits all retirement benefits and cannot run for public office again.

Kay Ivey

Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey, pictured above, will now finish out the term. The next gubernatorial election is in 2018.

It’s been a busy 11 months for Montgomery. In May, state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore was removed from office for a second time. For this incident, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary suspended him for ethics code violations in regards to enforcing federal rulings on same-sex marriage.

In June, Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard was found guilty of violating state ethics rules — including ones he implemented — and later sentenced to 4 years in prison, 8 years probation and a $210,000 fine.

Vote 2016: Alabama general election results

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

Vote 2016Our long national nightmare is almost over. As Election Day 2016 winds down, we present the results from today’s races in Alabama and the Birmingham metro area.

More election coverage in our Vote 2016 special report.

Updated Nov. 9: Voter turnout statewide was 61.97 percent.

(Updating throughout the evening.)

 

(Contested races only)

  • D = Democrat | I = incumbent | R = Republican
  • Winner in red

National/state

Local

Amendments

Tweets

This just in on Twitter …

Facebook

Visit the Birmingham, Ala., page on Facebook.

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: General election, why the hell not?

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016
voting booth

Photo: Phgaillard2001 (CC)

Time to vote: Polls are open till 7 tonight for races at the local, state and national levels.

Vote 2016Q: Where do I vote?

A: Call Jefferson County: (205) 325-5550, Jefferson County (Bessemer only): (205) 481-4105, Shelby County: (205) 669-3913.

Or Search Your Polling Place on AlabamaVotes.gov.

Wade on Birmingham:
election results tonight

Remember, if you have problems at your polling place:

  • Notify a poll worker immediately.
  • Call the state attorney general at 1-800-831-8814 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Wednesday or fill out this online form.
  • Call the secretary of state at 1-800-274-VOTE (8683) or visit his site, StopVoterFraudNow.com.
  • And tell the probate court for Jefferson County (205-325-5203) or Shelby County (205-669-3713).
  • Nationwide: 866-OUR-VOTE (687-8683)
  • E-mail us at Vote2016[at]wadeonbirmingham.com.

Q: What can I expect to see on the ballots?

A: Check out these sample ballots for each county.

You’re voting for president, U.S. Senator and Representative, state and county officials.

Who are you voting for today? Tell us in the comments.

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Sample ballots for Jefferson, Shelby County general election

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

We’re pretty sure these are the right ballots.

Vote 2016The State of Alabama reprinted 2.7 million ballots earlier this month after omitting language from one of the 14(!) amendments up for our consideration; Secretary of State John Merrill said he didn’t know what the blunder cost.

Anyway, download your sample ballot for Jefferson or Shelby County for the Nov. 8 general election. Good luck, Jefferson County residents: The 364-page PDF contains 91(!!) versions of the four-page ballot to correspond with various overlaps in federal, state, county and city districts.

Also, check out the Alabama Voter Guide, with voting procedures and frequently asked questions.

For easier viewing, you can print, download or zoom to full screen with each ballot.

• • •

Sample ballots for all 67 counties.

• • •

Jefferson County

Shelby County

Alabama Voter Guide 2016

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Alabama primary election runoff results

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Today’s runoff results from state and metro Birmingham races … (Primary results from March 1.)

Vote 2016More election coverage in our Vote 2016 special report.

The general election takes place Nov. 8.

 

 

Voter turnout (estimated):

  • Alabama: 5 percent
  • Jefferson County: 3 percent
  • Shelby County: 6 percent

All races

Winner in red

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Sample ballots for Jefferson, Shelby County primary runoffs

Friday, April 8th, 2016

A handful of voters will visit the polls next week to decide the runoff races in Alabama. Some districts — but not all — in the 41 counties holding runoff elections will have contests.

Vote 2012Sample ballots for Jefferson and Shelby Counties are included below. Birmingham Watch has a guide to the remaining candidates in Birmingham-area races.

For easier viewing, you can download or zoom to full screen with the embedded Jefferson County Democratic runoff ballot.

Polls open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday.

• • •

Find your polling place and districts.

• • •

Sample ballots for other counties with runoffs.

• • •

Jefferson County: Democratic ballot

Jefferson County: Republican ballot

Jefferson County 2016 Republican runoff sample ballot

Shelby County: Republican ballot

Shelby County 2016 Republican runoff sample ballot

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Alabama primary election results

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

Alabama 2016 presidential primary chart

Chart: Alabama presidential primary 2016

Election results from today’s primaries in Alabama and the Birmingham metro area …

Vote 2016More election coverage in our Vote 2016 special report.

(Updating throughout the evening.)

The runoff takes place April 12.

 

Voter turnout:

  • Alabama: 41 percent
  • Jefferson County: 43 percent
  • Shelby County: 50 percent

Results for Jefferson County and Shelby County.

Democrats

(Contested races only)

Winner in red | Runoff candidates in blue

Republicans

(Contested races only)

Winner in red | Runoff candidates in blue

Amendments

Tweets

This just in on Twitter …

Facebook

Visit the Birmingham, Ala., page on Facebook.

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Alabama v. Apathy: Dawn of Super Tuesday

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

American flag, by James Willamor

Photo: James Willamor (CC)

Look at Alabama, the early bird getting the political worm all thanks to today’s primary. Twelve other states and American Samoa are participating in Super Tuesday, a k a the SEC Primary.

Vote 2016The polls are open: Voting takes place till 7 p.m. for candidate in national, state and local races.

Q: Where do I vote?

A: Call Jefferson County: (205) 325-5550, Jefferson County (Bessemer only): (205) 481-4105, Shelby County: (205) 669-3913.

Or Search Your Polling Place on AlabamaVotes.gov.

Wade on Birmingham:
primary election results tonight

Remember, if you have problems at your polling place:

  • Notify a poll worker immediately.
  • Call the state attorney general at 1-800-831-8814 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Wednesday or fill out this online form.
  • Call the secretary of state at 1-800-274-VOTE (8683) or visit StopVoterFraudNow.com.
  • And tell the probate court for Jefferson County (205-325-5203) or Shelby County (205-669-3713).
  • E-mail us at Vote2016[at]wadeonbirmingham.com.

Q: What can I expect to see on the ballots?

A: Check out these sample ballots for each county.

You’re voting for president, U.S. Senator, state and county officials, plus a statewide amendment.

Let us know where and when you voted, and how many votes were cast before yours.

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Vote 2016: Sample ballots for Jefferson, Shelby County primaries

Friday, February 12th, 2016

Download general election sample ballots
for Jefferson, Shelby Counties

Voting registration deadline Monday

Alabamians will have a shot at shaping the presidential race for 2016.

Vote 2012With an early SEC Primary on March 1, Alabama will be among 14 states and territories holding elections on Super Tuesday. Also on the ballot, a Senate race, several state and county races and an state amendment.

Citizens still have time to register to vote, either online (for the first time) or by handing in this PDF form. The deadline is 11:59 p.m. Monday for online submission or end of business Monday at the county Board of Registrar offices for hand-delivered forms.

To help you see the full candidate list for your district, we’ve included sample ballots for Jefferson and Shelby Counties for the primaries. (The Jefferson County ballots, 32 pages and 46 pages, include versions for every district.)

Also included is the Alabama Voter Guide, which has information on voting procedures and frequently asked questions.

For easier viewing, you can download or zoom to full screen with each ballot.

Primary elections take place March 1 across the state.

• • •

Find your polling place and districts.

• • •

Sample ballots for all 67 counties.

• • •

Jefferson County: Democratic ballot

Jefferson County: Republican ballot

Shelby County: Democratic ballot

Shelby County: Republican ballot

Alabama Voter Guide 2016

• • •

More Vote 2016 coverage.

Books: Excerpt from Tanner Latham’s ‘Know Thy Farmer’

Sunday, December 13th, 2015

Tanner Latham, Know Thy Farmer

The following chapter is an excerpt from San Francisco author Tanner Latham’s “Know Thy Farmer.” He is a Piedmont native and a content strategist, writer, editor, radio reporter and multimedia storyteller. Latham is also a former Southern Living colleague of mine.

His book profiles 30 Alabama farmers and the food they provide to chefs and restaurants.

In this excerpt, Latham recounts a farm-to-table dinner at Sanctuary Farms.

• • •

Farm Dinner

The guests rolled in slowly in near-idling cars and discovered the bright, mid-afternoon sun bathing warm light over the house, barn and a patchwork layout of heirloom fruits, vegetables, flowers and herbs anchoring this little farm. A freshly mown path welcomed them and led their steps through naturally wild lawn grasses. It served as an entre to the evening’s event — a first scent of a seven-course dinner, a true farm to farm table experience. And at the path’s end, awaiting each guest, was the first sip — Peach Cobbler Moonshine cocktails stirred and seasoned with locally made popsicles. There, too, was the first bite — skewers of hushpuppies and fried green Sun Gold tomatoes picked earlier that morning from the vines beside which they now mingled.

Garlic. That was what initially sparked chef Drew Terp’s interest in Milan Davis and Jeannine Freed of Sanctuary Farms. “It was some of the most incredible garlic I had ever seen,” says Drew, who first met the couple at their booth at the Market at Pepper Place. “They had some of the most beautiful produce I’ve ever seen in any restaurant I had ever worked for. I’ve used ginger imported from all over the world, and Sanctuary’s was the most gorgeous I can remember.”

The couple was fairly smitten with Drew as well. “He had this very positive and boisterous presence,” says Jeannine. “His passion for food was contagious, and his personality went along with it.”

The chef visited the farmers at the market each week, buying produce, chatting and slowly, strongly building a relationship. One Saturday morning, Drew offered to volunteer on the farm just to see what the couple was doing and learn more about their process. The farmers obliged, and throughout the summer, he and his girlfriend visited the farm in Etowah County, Ala., and helped clear brush, till, plant seed and harvest.

After working one day, Jeannine and Milan began talking to Drew about their idea of hosting a fall dining event similar to those held among their network of farmers. It was an opportunity for a chef to show off his or her culinary skills at a farm, sourcing most of the ingredients on site.

“We were reaching a point where we had enough food in our garden,” says Jeannine. “We envisioned it more as a celebration of accomplishments of the season and sharing them with those who come and experience it.”

Yet, the farmer couple had never done anything like that before and weren’t sure how to even begin, but they knew they wanted it to be right. Lucky for them, Drew had experience hosting such events, and he willfully partnered with them as an organizer.

“Drew’s obvious passion left us with no doubts that we were going to plan a wonderful experience for everyone who came,” says Jeannine.

The cocktail hour spilled seamlessly into supper, and the guests moved to the barn to seat themselves on wood-topped bales of hay at tables built by Milan from wood he had milled. Above them, string lights and herbs hung from rafters. Around them, used burlap fabrics draped doorways. Before them, flower centerpieces colored the tables. Overhead, the sun was just beginning to set.

As Chef Drew’s team brought out the first course, a charcuterie board with cured meats, local cheeses, a savory okra jam, radish pickles, pickled garlic and local honey, the guests’ eyes widened and lit up, a response repeated with each course presentation throughout the evening.

Then came wrinkled potatoes with Spanish tortillas, a small-bite dish Drew had learned about while traveling through the Canary Islands. After that, mixed greens with seared goat cheese, figs and honey vinaigrette followed by a sweet potato soup with sage farmer’s cheese and brown butter emulsion.

“Everything had a really nice balance. Each course allowed the vegetable to be what it was without covering it up,” says Jeannine.

For the main course, Drew presented a suckling pig with rosemary polenta, glazed baby carrots and wild persimmon pork jus. It had actually been supplied and cooked on site by Will and Liz Doonan of Heron Hollow Farms located in Lacon, Ala.

“We structured the menu so that we would have intricate courses followed by easier courses,” says Drew. “We wanted plenty of time to prepare the more difficult dishes.” With each course, servers poured wine and beer pairings provided by Grassroots Wine from Birmingham and Gadsden-based Back Forty Beer Company. As they placed the plates, the chef stood before the guests and guided them through the dishes, explaining the sources and answering questions.

“It’s my passion,” says Drew. “If you take a plate, and you set it down in front of somebody, they can just taste it and decide if they like it or not. But when you can put something out in front of somebody and tell them a story about it, now they are eating through your eyes and looking at the food through the creator’s vision. They get the story behind the food. It’s so important when people are eating to know there is a background behind the food.”

A big, beautiful pecan tree stood next to the barn, its branches extending far enough that their ends sagged to the ground and created a natural canopy and seating area. With the supper courses finished — the fork-clinking silenced — the guests moved from the table to the tree to watch a bonfire grow into a cozy blaze that popped sparks upward to the dark sky.

Local musicians provided a post-dinner soundtrack, picking and singing folk and bluegrass songs. And for the final taste, the chef’s team served dessert, sea salt caramel popsicles from Gadsden-based Frios Gourmet Pops and Drew’s grandmommy’s recipe pecan pie made from nuts that had fallen from the large tree.

According to Jeannine, watching someone taste the produce she and Milan grows is akin to the moment you feel when you meet your soulmate. “It’s like, ‘Yes! That’s what I’m talking about!'” she says. “When someone gets the whole process, it’s kind of like a camaraderie. There’s a lot of passion in that moment. I think, ‘These are my people!’ Those moments contribute to making it all worth it. We can grow beautiful food, but there has to be someone there who truly enjoys it.”

She says that this event could not have occurred without their “farm community of friends” who willingly helped to make it happen in a passionate and selfless way. Those farmer friends and musicians sat and dined at the tables alongside the guests and added another depth and dimension to the atmosphere.

In a broad sense, Jeannine believes that events like this only occur when people care from where their food comes. Drew agrees, stating that a major problem today is that people lose track of their food sources. “You go to the store or drive-through and you buy food that is packaged, but that’s not real food,” he says. “The realness of an event like this is picking carrots that morning and serving them that night. You take the food right from the farm, make something beautiful and then share it with those around you. That is what is all about.”

These intimate dinners symbolize the best that has come from the farm-to-table movement and from literally knowing your farmer. They display a through-line that connects those who participate. Chefs respect and revere the live produce and even animals that grow just steps away from the diners. And the guests, a table full of strangers sitting elbow to elbow who quickly bond over their commonalities, can directly ask the farmers about their challenges or the chef about his vision for the dishes.

“This was not only the best of a beautiful harvest and a talented chef,” continues Jeannine. “But it was also a gathering where new friendships came together to show love and support among one another.”

Slowly, the guests peel away from the group and the bonfire’s warmth. With bellies full and smiles grand, they turn into the chill of the October evening and follow the same path, now lit by flickering, lighted bags, out to their cars. They occasionally steal a glance over their shoulders to view the glow of the barn and garden. But they have to return. Back to their homes. Back to their families. Back to their lives. Still, they now carry a memory that they’ll recount about a dinner that connected them to the land and to each other.

“This is how a community grows,” says Drew. “One person and story and experience at a time.”

• • •

“Know Thy Farmer” (November 2015, Friends of the Market)

Tanner Latham

To free UAB will require immense financial pressure

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

Ray Watts, UAB

UAB president Ray Watts shows where he had his soul
surgically removed. 

Author’s note: In the past, I have worked in my capacity as a communications consultant for the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Dear Free UAB,

Only 21 months till kickoff. Without you, we would have no 2017 season for Blazer football.

Of course, Dr. Ray Watts is still president of UAB, still collecting $853,464 annually for hiding from faculty and students and performing an inept job. It was 1 year ago today that Watts and his bosses in Tuscaloosa killed three sports teams, only to resurrect them 6 months later.

The good news is that you’ve met every athletics funding deadline so far, even the ones that have been moved up in a brazen attempt to discredit you. Now that the University of Alabama System board of trustees has shifted even more of the burden usually assumed by colleges to fans and donors, it can spend even more insane amounts of money on its preferred team in Tuscaloosa.

Speaking of preferred teams, it’s nice to see the rifle team with its 2015-16 schedule intact. Sadly for the bowling team, it has had to go dark till next season (or the season after, maybe). And the on-campus stadium plan may live someday as an off-campus stadium on the BJCC property, safe from the trustees’ spiteful actions.

It’s heartening to see the students and the faculty united in its official lack of confidence in Watts. But to pry him from his cushy expensive president’s chair will take more than chants of “Fire Ray Watts” at basketball games in Bartow Arena.

Much more.

The simplest equation is to make it more expensive to keep Watts than to send him back to medicine full time with an unholy severance package. All across the South, calculators have been working overtime on cost-benefit analyses …

  • Cheaper to keep or fire Les Miles at LSU? Keep, since the PR damage alone was astronomical.
  • Cheaper to keep or fire Mark Richt at Georgia? Fire, though the numbers aren’t looking real solid.
  • Cheaper to keep or fire president Tim Wolfe at Missouri? Fire (technically, resign), because football TV cash.

Watts is an expensive hot mess, but he’s simply not costly enough (yet) to trustees. I had suggested a year ago that UAB supporters oust him and then wrest the university from the UA System for the good of the school and Birmingham.

(If it was always about football and only football, then I guess … mission accomplished? But don’t be surprised when the board takes it away again.)

What does a Ray Watts cost UAB?

  • His salary, $2,338.26 a day (and that’s if he hasn’t received a raise, oy).
  • All those pricey consultants and attorneys.
  • His security detail.
  • His president’s mansion.
  • The new secret biased report to kill football, which we’ll find out about in August 2017.
  • The $1 billion Campaign for UAB, which was on pace to reach the finish line now but has slowed so much, it may be as late as 2019 (or worse).
  • Lost tuition (plus future alumni donations) from plummeting enrollment, down 7.3 percent from fall 2014.

While all of these cost UAB money, the key to is to hit the board where it hurts most: the University of Alabama. The school is on track for another national championship, with the mountains of cash that come with it, so you must be clever and persistent in finding any financial weaknesses.

The Mizzou football team figured it out, using its leverage to force the school to act decisively and quickly on allegations of long-term racist harassment of students. Replacing Wolfe is far easier and cheaper than forfeiting to BYU.

Until you convince enough fans, football recruits, donors (individual and corporate), professors and politicians to abandon Tuscaloosa, you have no leverage. Until you steer away millions of dollars for buildings, players, coaches and research projects, you have no hope.

It may take years/election cycles. It may take scorched earth. It may take a beatdown of every board member’s company. But it can be done.

The fight has to be uglier and hit the trustees where it hurts most, right in the bank account.

Go Blazers,

Wade

Video: E.O. Wilson, ant man

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

Video: “E.O. Wilson: Of Ants and Men”

A lifetime of studying the natural world has aired on PBS as a 2-hour prime-time documentary. “E.O. Wilson: Of Ants and Men” premiered in September.

The titular subject was born in Birmingham and spent his childhood in Mobile and Washington. He studied at Alabama and later Harvard. His career in science led to the creation of sociobiology, earning him a U.S. National Medal of Science. Wilson has authored many books, which brought him two Pulitzer Prizes.

The program looks at milestones in his life, along with the ways we better understand the world, including the formation and behavior of ant societies, and how humans have much more in common with them than with chimps. Wilson spends time in our state’s rich environment, and even dissects the tribalism behind Alabama (and Auburn) football.

E.O. Wilson

E.O. Wilson in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique,
in a scene from “Of Ants and Men”